Day: September 28, 2009

Johns Hopkins epigenetic center receives $16.8 million NIH grant

September 28, 2009

Johns Hopkins’ Center for the Epigenetics of Common Human Disease has been chosen as one of four recipients of a $45 million National Institutes of Health grant for Centers of Excellence to advance genomics research. The Johns Hopkins center will receive $16.8 million over five years.

Great Scott: Fitzgerald’s Baltimore

September 28, 2009

Even the great ones get writer’s block. F. Scott Fitzgerald described such a circumstance—and how he nudged himself out of it with a bus trip, a leisurely stroll and a trip to his local barbershop—in an article titled “Afternoon of an Author,” published in Esquire in 1936.

Using stimulus dollars to decode human number sense

September 28, 2009

That’s why a team of psychologists at The Johns Hopkins University’s Krieger School of Arts and Sciences is using a $1.6 million National Institutes of Health grant, underwritten in part by the federal stimulus package, to finance a multifaceted study aimed at decoding some of the mysteries of the human approximate number system, or ANS. They want to find out, for instance, everything from how it changes from infancy through adulthood to the impact that number sense acuity has on later success (or failure) in academic and higher order mathematics.
Lisa Feigenson is teaming up with her research partner and husband, Justin Halberda, both assistant professors in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, on the project.

MESSENGER spacecraft prepares for final pass by Mercury

September 28, 2009

On Tuesday, Sept. 29, the MESSENGER spacecraft will fly by Mercury for the third and final time, passing 141.7 miles above the planet’s rocky surface for a final gravity assist that will enable it to enter orbit about Mercury in 2011. With more than 90 percent of the planet’s surface already imaged, the team will turn its instruments during this flyby to specific features to uncover more information about the planet closest to the sun.

Racial disparities in diabetes tied to living conditions

September 28, 2009

The higher incidence of diabetes among African-Americans when compared to whites may have more to do with living conditions than genetics, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study, available online in advance of publication in the October edition of the Journal of General Internal Medicine, found that when African-Americans and whites live in similar environments and have similar incomes, their diabetes rates are similar, a finding that contrasts with the fact that diabetes is more prevalent nationally among African-Americans than whites.

JHU passes $100 million in ARRA funds

September 28, 2009

The Johns Hopkins University has won 250 research grants, totaling more than $114 million, through provisions in the federal stimulus package designed to advance scientific and medical knowledge while jump-starting the U.S. economy.

Research universities launch online news compendium

September 28, 2009

Futurity spotlights latest discoveries in science, health, other disciplines

Nursing receives prestigious WHO redesignation

September 28, 2009

The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing has earned the World Health Organization’s regional Pan American Health Organization redesignation as a collaborating center for nursing information, knowledge management and sharing.

NIH Pioneer, Innovator awards go to Johns Hopkins scientists

September 28, 2009

A Johns Hopkins scientist who proposes to manipulate forces to activate enzymes in live cells and a researcher who has developed a way to hunt down tuberculosis germs with real-time imaging have received a total of $4 million in special awards from the National Institutes of Health.

Study: Johns Hopkins researchers ID brain-protecting protein

September 28, 2009

Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered a novel protein that can protect brain cells by interrupting a naturally occurring “stress cascade” resulting in cell death.

School-family-community success stories profiled

September 28, 2009

The National Network of Partnership Schools at Johns Hopkins has published Promising Partnership Practices 2009, a collection of more than 110 best practices chosen from schools, districts and organizations across the country. The activities are used to improve reading, math, science, attendance and multicultural understanding, and to create a family-friendly school environment. Among them are math and reading nights, science and social studies projects, back-to-school events, and health and safety programs.

Flu update: Vaccines, university sick-leave policies

September 28, 2009

This year’s flu season arrives in two guises: the seasonal and H1N1 varieties. In an e-mail last week regarding their status at Johns Hopkins, Charlene Hayes, vice president for human resources, reminded faculty and staff that the university has already begun vaccinating employees against seasonal flu. “Public health officials say it is still important to get this protection, since seasonal flu likely will surface more frequently as the weather turns cold,” she said.

High school diploma alone isn’t the solution for livelihoods

September 28, 2009

Recent graduates from Philadelphia’s public high schools had higher employment rates and higher annual earnings than their classmates who dropped out, but many of them still did not have incomes above the federal poverty line, according to a new study from the Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins. The report suggests that although it is […]

Mild exercise in ICU reduces bad effects of prolonged bed rest

September 28, 2009

Critical care experts at Johns Hopkins are reporting initial success in boosting recovery and combating muscle wasting among critically ill, mostly bed-bound patients using any one of a trio of mild physical therapy exercises during their stays in the intensive care unit.

Scientists find pace-setter for repair in badly damaged lungs

September 28, 2009

After more than 50 experiments in mice, medical scientists at Johns Hopkins have mapped out the basic steps taken by a particular set of white blood cells in setting the pace of recovery after serious lung injury.

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