Day: November 15, 2010

Q&A with School of Medicine’s Ed Miller

November 15, 2010

This is part of a yearlong series of talks with the leaders of Johns Hopkins’ nine academic divisions and the Applied Physics Laboratory. Edward D. Miller, the 13th dean of the School of Medicine and inaugural CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine, has symmetrically entered the 13th year of his tenure. The university’s currently longest-serving dean […]

Students want to give back more

November 15, 2010

Johns Hopkins students give back, and want to give some more, according to a survey conducted earlier this year on the Homewood campus. Nearly 72 percent of students surveyed said that they participate in some form of community service. Nearly the same number wanted their involvement in the community to increase. The Center for Social […]

Tim Weihs tapped as Leadership Education Center director

November 15, 2010

For Tim Weihs, whose new job is to help Johns Hopkins students make the jump from labs and lecture halls to business meetings and boardrooms, the journey is a familiar one. Weihs, a professor of materials science and engineering, has spent much of the past decade steering a high-temperature, quick-bonding foil out of his own […]

QVC head Michael George is next ‘Leaders + Legends’ speaker

November 15, 2010

Michael “Mike” George, president of QVC Inc., is the featured speaker at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School’s Leaders + Legends lecture series on Friday, Nov. 19. The event will take place from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at the Legg Mason Tower in Harbor East. His talk is titled “Strategies for Winning in the Digital […]

Historic American Indian photos on display at Evergreen

November 15, 2010

Opening this week at Johns Hopkins University’s Evergreen Museum & Library is the exhibition “Edward S. Curtis: Photogravures from The North American Indian,” which will run through March 27. The museum will host an opening reception from 6 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 17, with curatorial remarks at 7 p.m. The opening is free, […]

School of Public Health researcher recognized with Presidential Early Career Award

November 15, 2010

Catherine Bradshaw, a developmental psychologist and youth violence prevention researcher at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, has received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers. This year’s […]

Young Baltimoreans offered free screening for heart disease risks

November 15, 2010

Some 30 Johns Hopkins cardiologists, nurses, technical staff and administrative volunteers have for the first time partnered with Baltimore City Public Schools to screen for early signs of heart disease in as many as 2,000 high school–bound Baltimore-area students. The students, all bound for grade 9 in 2011, and their parents were among thousands of […]

Season begins with tragic love story (what else?)

November 15, 2010

Peabody Opera Theatre will present a new, fully staged production of Jules Massenet’s Manon, named for the fictional young woman whose tragic love story inspired no fewer than three operas (the others by Auber and Puccini), as the first part of its French Season of Opera. Sung in French with English supertitles, Manon will be […]

‘Media 3.0’ is focus of talk by ‘Times’ reporter David Carr

November 15, 2010

David Carr of The New York Times will give a talk at Homewood this week titled “Putting a New Frame on Content: Media 3.0 in an Age of iPads, Mashed-Up Hybrids and an Audience that Generates Content.” Carr is an award-winning media and culture reporter. Before joining The New York Times, he was a contributing […]

Women take note: High cholesterol in middle age not a risk factor for Alzheimer’s, other dementias

November 15, 2010

High cholesterol levels in middle age do not appear to increase women’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia later in life, new Johns Hopkins–led research finds, despite a body of scientific evidence long suggesting a link between the two. What the study, published online Nov. 10 in the journal Neurology, does […]

Vitamin D deficit doubles risk of stroke in whites, not blacks

November 15, 2010

Having low levels of vitamin D, the essential nutrient obtained from milk, fortified cereals and exposure to sunlight, doubles the risk of stroke in whites, but not in blacks, according to a new report by researchers at Johns Hopkins. Stroke is the nation’s third-leading cause of death, killing more than 140,000 Americans annually and temporarily […]

Study: Revaccination could benefit HIV-infected children

November 15, 2010

HIV-infected children receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy, or HAART, may require revaccination to maintain immunity against preventable diseases. There remains no standard or official recommendation on revaccination of children receiving HAART, an effective intervention in reducing morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected children. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health reviewed published data […]

Not so fast: Docs should wait longer for signs of brain recovery

November 15, 2010

Heart experts at Johns Hopkins say that physicians might be drawing conclusions too soon about irreversible brain damage in patients surviving cardiac arrest whose bodies were for a day initially chilled into a calming coma. The chilling, known as therapeutic hypothermia, is one of the few medical practices known to improve brain recovery after sudden […]

Cheers — November 15, 2010

November 15, 2010

BAYVIEW MEDICAL CENTER Neeraj Naval has been appointed director of Neuro-Critical Care. With a background in neurology, neurosurgery and anesthesiology–critical care medicine, Naval, an assistant professor, focuses on managing critically ill patients with neurological conditions such as subarachanoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage and ischemic stroke. After receiving his medical degree from Grant Medical College in Mumbai, […]

Low-cost treatment helps prevent TB in people with HIV

November 15, 2010

Early results from a group of clinical trials in Africa and South America support wider use of a low-cost treatment to prevent the emergence of active tuberculosis in people living with HIV/AIDS. In a supplement published Nov. 11 in the journal Aids, researchers affiliated with the Consortium to Respond Effectively to the AIDS/TB Epidemic, known […]

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