Day: February 1, 2010

LEEDing the way to a greener JHU

February 1, 2010

In Johns Hopkins’ quest to go green and significantly reduce its environmental footprint, the university has passed a major milestone. The School of Medicine recently received a LEED commercial interior silver certification for its renovated Department of Facilities Management offices and Clinical Information Systems Education Center—both located on the basement floor of the 2024 E. […]

Foreign Affairs Symposium kicks off Tuesday

February 1, 2010

With a lineup of big-name speakers and a new, interactive Web site, the annual student-run Foreign Affairs Symposium is returning to the Homewood campus this week, with a talk by two-time Pulitzer Prize winner and New York Times op-ed columnist Nicholas Kristof at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 2, in Shriver Hall Auditorium. Kristof’s visit […]

Johns Hopkins disaster team’s first group deploys to Haiti

February 1, 2010

The Johns Hopkins Office of Critical Event Preparedness and Response has deployed its first group of Johns Hopkins physicians, nurses and other experts to Haiti to help that nation’s injured and suffering. A second group will leave on Thursday. The medical experts serve on the Johns Hopkins Go Team, which has approximately 185 members who […]

Jhpiego helps reopen, restock maternity ward in Haiti

February 1, 2010

A health care team from Jhpiego, a Johns Hopkins affiliate focused globally on maternal and child health, is on the ground in Haiti, working to restore safe and quality health care services for pregnant women, new mothers and their babies. Since three health care workers from the organization’s Baltimore office joined their Haitian colleagues in Port-au-Prince […]

Residents collect 1,100 crutches for victims of quake

February 1, 2010

When a group of pediatric residents returned from working with earthquake victims in Haiti, they made a public plea for crutches desperately needed by those suffering from amputations and crush injuries. Their collection started last Monday at Johns Hopkins’ David M. Rubenstein Child Health Building, and by press time on Friday, they had gathered more […]

Maryland honors Nobel laureate

February 1, 2010

The top elected officials in Annapolis opened their arms on Thursday for Carol Greider, Johns Hopkins’ newest Nobel laureate. Greider, who earlier last month accepted her 2009 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine in a ceremony in Stockholm, was honored on Thursday with twin recognition ceremonies in the Maryland House of Delegates and Senate. Both […]

Celentano named Dr. Charles Armstrong Chair of Epidemiology

February 1, 2010

David Celentano will be installed on Wednesday, Feb. 3, as the inaugural Dr. Charles Armstrong Chair and Professor of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Celentano, who had served as interim chair of the department since September 2008, was selected to lead it following an international search. The named professorship was […]

Rising to the challenge: The quiet contributors

February 1, 2010

Unless you stumbled upon it, you probably wouldn’t know about the Hodson Scholars Luncheon. For decades, it’s been an annual tradition on the Homewood campus, bringing administrators, faculty and a select group of students together each December to acknowledge and celebrate a remarkable ongoing relationship that stretches back more than half a century.

Cardiologist tracks biomarkers for an elusive killer: IPH

February 1, 2010

Johns Hopkins Children’s Center cardiologist Allen Everett recently won more than $460,000 in stimulus grant funding to identify the biomarkers of idiopathic pulmonary hypertension, or IPH, a progressive and highly lethal condition in children and adults marked by persistently elevated pressure in the artery that carries blood from the heart to the lungs. Biomarkers—biological “byproducts” […]

Stressed nanomaterials display unexpected movement

February 1, 2010

Researchers have discovered that, under the right conditions, newly developed nanocrystalline materials exhibit surprising activity in the tiny spaces between the geometric clusters of atoms called nanocrystals, from which they are made. This finding, detailed recently in the journal Science, is important because these nanomaterials are becoming more ubiquitous in the fabrication of microdevices and […]

Old antidepressant offers promise in treating heart failure

February 1, 2010

A team of researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found in animal experiments that an antidepressant developed more than 40 years ago can blunt and even reverse the muscle enlargement and weakened pumping function associated with heart failure. In a report published in the Jan. 8 edition of Circulation Research, U.S. and Italian heart experts […]

DID U TK UR MEDS? Texting can improve care of patients

February 1, 2010

From a lethal distraction for drivers to dehumanizing personal interactions, text messaging has gotten a bum rap lately. But for doctors treating patients with chronic diseases, text messaging can be an invaluable tool, according to Johns Hopkins Children’s Center pediatrician Delphine Robotham. “For better or worse, this technology is here,” she said, “and sending a […]

Guided Care participants rate quality of health care higher

February 1, 2010

Chronically ill older adults who are closely supported by a nurse-physician primary care team are twice as likely to rate their health care as high-quality than those who receive usual care, according to a study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The research, published online in the latest edition of […]

Kids with suspected development problems may not get referrals

February 1, 2010

Many pediatricians score high on screening their patients for developmental delays but barely make a passing grade in referring children with suspected delays for further testing or treatment, according to a study from Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and other institutions to appear in the February issue of Pediatrics. Because screening is effective only if followed […]

Transmission dynamics of H1N1 similar to previous flu strains

February 1, 2010

The April 2009 H1N1 outbreak at a Queens, New York, high school was widespread but did not cause severe disease, according to an analysis conducted by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Their findings suggest that the transmission and spread […]

Next Page »