Day: February 14, 2011

E2SHI: New acronym, big ambitions

February 14, 2011

Drawing on faculty expertise in environmental science and engineering, public health and other areas, The Johns Hopkins University has launched its Environment, Energy, Sustainability and Health Institute to promote research and education in topics ranging from green energy practices to climate change and related health issues. “This kind of research right now is distributed all […]

Something in Commons

February 14, 2011

Mike Yassa knows brain science, but caramel apples leave him in sticky knots. Yassa, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, wrestled with the treat at the Charles Commons Connections welcome back event on Feb. 1, his first official appearance as the Homewood residence hall’s new faculty in residence. “My caramel […]

Foreign Affairs Symposium to highlight global citizenship

February 14, 2011

The annual student-run Foreign Affairs Symposium at Johns Hopkins returns on Wednesday, Feb. 16, when former Sen. Chuck Hagel will be the first of 10 prominent speakers to visit the Homewood campus during the spring semester. Hagel’s talk at 7 p.m. in 110 Hodson Hall begins the series of topical lectures and panel discussions under […]

JHU launches certificate in biotechnology education

February 14, 2011

This summer, The Johns Hopkins University will begin offering a unique graduate certificate in the field of bioscience education to address a national shortage of teachers in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math, often referred to as STEM. The new 20-credit graduate certificate in biotechnology education was created through a partnership between Johns […]

CEO of Veolia Transportation to speak at Leaders + Legends

February 14, 2011

Mark Joseph, chief executive officer and vice chairman of Veolia Transportation, is the featured speaker at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School’s Leaders + Legends lecture series on Wednesday, Feb. 16. The event will take place from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at the Legg Mason Tower in Harbor East.  The title of his remarks is […]

Safety checklist use yields 10 percent drop in hospital deaths

February 14, 2011

A Johns Hopkins–led safety checklist program that virtually eliminated bloodstream infections in hospital intensive care units throughout Michigan appears to have also reduced deaths by 10 percent, a new study suggests. Although prior research showed a major reduction in central line–related bloodstream infections at hospitals using the checklist, the new study is the first to show […]

Johns Hopkins’ Andrew Ewald honored by anatomy society

February 14, 2011

Andrew Ewald, who studies how cells build organs and how these same cellular processes can contribute to breast cancer metastasis, will receive the American Association of Anatomists’ 2011 Morphological Sciences Award for his “outstanding contributions to the field of epithelial morphogenesis.” He will present an award lecture at the Annual Meeting of the American Association […]

‘.jpg’ for the mind: How the brain compresses visual information

February 14, 2011

Most of us are familiar with the idea of image compression in computers. File extensions such as “.jpg” or “.png” signify that millions of pixel values have been compressed into a more-efficient format, reducing file size by a factor of 10 or more with little or no apparent change in image quality. The full set […]

Peabody Chamber Opera remembers the ’50s at Theatre Project

February 14, 2011

Peabody Chamber Opera will present Remember the Fifties—a double bill of one-act operas about the decade of Eisenhower, Burma Shave and I Love Lucy—at Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St., from Feb. 24 to 27. The two works are Lee Hoiby’s This Is the Rill Speaking of 1991 and Leonard Bernstein’s Trouble in Tahiti of […]

Slowing growth of bladder, breast cancer cells

February 14, 2011

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered that nitroxoline, an antibiotic commonly used around the world to treat urinary tract infections, can slow or stop the growth of human breast and bladder cancer cells by blocking the formation of new blood vessels. The results, appearing in the Dec. 15 issue of […]

Internal med residents graduate unprepared for primary care

February 14, 2011

Doctors who have completed training in internal medicine are in general poorly prepared for jobs as primary care physicians, most notably lacking the knowledge to best care for patients with chronic conditions such as diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol, a new Johns Hopkins study suggests. The researchers also found, however, that physicians who completed internal […]

Accountable care at academic medical centers: Lessons learned

February 14, 2011

Academic medical centers must adjust and adapt to the new health care reform laws or risk marginalization in the new health care arena, according to a New England Journal of Medicine “Perspective” article published online Feb. 2. The authors of the article, Scott A. Berkowitz, a fellow in cardiology and geriatrics at the Johns Hopkins […]

Study to evaluate if ‘dummy’ education is smart for nurses

February 14, 2011

How can patient simulators—high-tech manikins that respond to a nurse’s care—help prepare the nurses of tomorrow? The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing is among 10 nursing schools nationwide collaborating on a landmark study to find out just how smart this “dummy” education can be. “Nursing students have been learning their clinical skills the same […]

Sharon Gerecht of WSE receives CAREER award

February 14, 2011

Sharon Gerecht, an assistant professor in the Whiting School’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, is the recipient of a Faculty Early Career Development Award from the National Science Foundation. The CAREER award, given to faculty members at the beginning of their academic careers, is one of NSF’s most competitive awards and emphasizes high-quality research […]

BME grad student team scores in business plan competition

February 14, 2011

A team of Johns Hopkins biomedical engineering graduate students tied for first place in the 2011 Georgia Bowl Business Plan Competition, hosted Feb. 4 and 5 by Kennesaw State University. Team members presented their business plan for TheraCord, a system that the students developed to improve the process of umbilical cord blood collection. Stem cells preserved […]

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