Day: March 28, 2011

New teaching track for health professionals

March 28, 2011

For health professionals, the classroom is a familiar place; most undertake six to 11 years of post-secondary education on the path to becoming doctors, nurses, research scientists or public health practitioners. They know blood structure, disease variables and human anatomy, from the skeletal to the nervous system. But can they effectively teach these subjects to the […]

New venture to put 30,000 scholarly books online

March 28, 2011

Project MUSE, the highly successful online journals collection managed by the Johns Hopkins University Press, recently announced a partnership with the University Press e-book Consortium to create an extensive online collection of scholarly book content. The result of this merger, to be called the University Press Content Consortium, will launch Jan. 1, 2012, and initially […]

Serving up good will

March 28, 2011

Ten Johns Hopkins undergraduates cooked and served dinner for area residents on Wednesday at the Church of the Guardian Angel, located in the Remington neighborhood near the Homewood campus, as part of the university’s third annual Alternative Spring Break program. The undergraduates were filling in for the regular student volunteers (away on break) at Campus […]

Spacecraft data confirm orbit of Messenger around Mercury

March 28, 2011

Data from its first three days in orbit about Mercury confirmed the initial assessment of the spacecraft team that Messenger is in its intended orbit and operating nominally. “The team is relieved that things have gone so well, but they remain busy as they continue to configure the spacecraft for orbital operations and monitor its […]

New interface launched for searching JHU libraries collection

March 28, 2011

Students and faculty returning from spring break will notice something different when they get back into the swing of their research. Catalyst, a new search interface, was launched on March 18. The tool, several years in the making, is an open source project and was developed at Johns Hopkins by programmers and librarians from across […]

New tuition fees set; undergrad aid to increase

March 28, 2011

Tuition for full-time undergraduates at The Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus will increase 3.9 percent this fall, the third consecutive increase below 4 percent. The increase, amounting to $1,600, will bring tuition to $42,280 for the nearly 5,000 full-time undergraduates in the university’s Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Whiting School of Engineering. The […]

Hopkins-wide research project addresses climate change

March 28, 2011

The Applied Physics Laboratory is leading an ambitious Johns Hopkins–wide program to study and address the potential impacts of climate change on human activity. Called the Global Assimilation of Information for Action, or GAIA, the APL-funded initiative draws expertise from within the Lab and several university divisions to provide tools and information that decision-makers can […]

Ignition Grants create sparks at Applied Physics Lab

March 28, 2011

For David L. Porter, an oceanographer at Johns Hopkins’ Applied Physics Laboratory, his idea for the iBuoy came from an ad for a tablet computer. For robotics scientist Chris Brown, his inspiration for a miniature robot was based on the needs of special operations troops. And for Vina Nguyen, Kalman Hazins and Christina Pikas, it […]

Arts Innovation Grants fund new courses, other initiatives

March 28, 2011

The Johns Hopkins University has awarded approximately $20,000 in grants to students and faculty to stimulate new courses in the arts and other arts-related efforts on the Homewood campus, said Winston Tabb, Sheridan Dean of University Libraries and Museums. The Arts Innovation Program, initiated in 2006, offers funding to faculty to create new courses in […]

Robert Black of SPH recognized for contributions to child health

March 28, 2011

Robert Edward Black, an international expert in the prevention of childhood mortality and illness, is the recipient of the 2011 Canada Gairdner Global Health Award. The annual award from the Gairdner Foundation recognizes individuals responsible for a scientific advancement that has made, or has the potential to make, significant impact on health in the developing […]

BME prof wins Olympus Emerging Educational Leader Award

March 28, 2011

A Johns Hopkins biomedical engineering faculty member who helps students become medical device inventors and business leaders has been named one of the three 2011 winners in the Olympus Innovation Awards Program. The Olympus Emerging Educational Leader Award was given to Soumyadipta Acharya, an assistant research professor and graduate program director for the Center for Bioengineering […]

K.T. Ramesh named to WSE’s Alonzo G. Decker Jr. Chair

March 28, 2011

K.T. Ramesh, a professor of mechanical engineering, has been named to the Whiting School of Engineering’s Alonzo G. Decker Jr. Chair in Science and Engineering, effective March 1. A dedication ceremony is planned for April 8. “K.T. is a brilliant scholar who has also been an extremely effective leader in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, […]

‘Baltimore, Film and the Arts’ panel kicks off film festival

March 28, 2011

The 14th annual student-run Johns Hopkins Film Fest returns to the Homewood campus on Thursday, March 31, with a special panel discussion, “Film Fest Forum: Baltimore, Film and the Arts,” with Film and Media Studies lecturer and filmmaker Matthew Porterfield, film and video artist Jimmy Joe Roche, multimedia artist Pamela Phatsimo Sunstrom, musician/photographer Andrew Laumann […]

Labor statistics: Counting the volunteers the world counts on

March 28, 2011

The International Labour Organization and the Johns Hopkins University Center for Civil Society Studies announced last week the release of a new manual to help statistical agencies around the world track the amount, type and value of volunteer work in their countries. The manual, drafted by the Center for Civil Society Studies in cooperation with […]

Potassium levels may be key to racial disparity in type 2 diabetes

March 28, 2011

Lower potassium levels in the blood may help explain why African-Americans are twice as likely as whites to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, according to a new study by Johns Hopkins researchers. The findings, if confirmed, suggest that part of diabetes prevention may someday prove as easy as taking a cheap potassium supplement. “This […]

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