Day: July 19, 2010

Carey Business School heads to Harbor East

July 19, 2010

Johns Hopkins’ business school will be in the moving business this week as it takes up residence at its new home on the waterfront at Harbor East. The Carey Business School, headquartered for much of the past decade at the Downtown Center at Charles and Fayette streets, will be moving equipment and supplies later this […]

Johns Hopkins University hits $200 million mark in ARRA grants

July 19, 2010

The Johns Hopkins University has to date been awarded more than $200 million in National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation research grants through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, also known as the federal stimulus package. The 424 grants are financing investigations ranging from how the universe began to how men […]

Home again in Gilman Hall

July 19, 2010

If these Gilman walls could talk, they would have said, “Welcome home.” After more than two years away, the School of Arts and Sciences’ humanities faculty moved back into the extensively renovated Gilman Hall earlier this month. The building was re-populated from the top down, starting with the Department of German and Romance Languages and […]

Rare 17th-century violin is new star of Peabody’s collection

July 19, 2010

The Peabody Institute recently received a donation to its fine instrument collection that instantly becomes its finest. Karl Kostoff, 85, a former professional musician and longtime employee of the university’s Applied Physics Laboratory, has gifted to Peabody a rare Maggini violin crafted in 1620. Kostoff said that he wanted the instrument to be played and […]

Caroline Laguerre-Brown named vice provost for institutional equity

July 19, 2010

Caroline Laguerre-Brown, who for the past four years has worked to strengthen fairness, inclusion and diversity guidelines, programs and initiatives at The Johns Hopkins University, has been named vice provost for institutional equity. Laguerre-Brown, formerly associate vice provost for institutional equity, succeeds Ray Gillian, who retired last month. Her appointment was effective July 1. Provost […]

Steven Baxter, former dean of the Peabody Conservatory, dies at 63

July 19, 2010

Steven Baxter, dean of the Peabody Conservatory from 1996 to 2002, died on July 5 from mesothelioma at the Gilchrist Hospice Center in Towson. The Cockeysville, Md., resident was 63. An oboist, Baxter came to Peabody in 1984, teaching in and coordinating the Music Education Department, then serving as assistant dean for academic affairs and, […]

APL gets funding to test thought-controlled prosthetic limb

July 19, 2010

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has awarded a contract for up to $34.5 million to the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory to manage the development and testing of the Modular Prosthetic Limb, or MPL, on a human subject, using a brain-controlled interface. APL scientists and engineers developed the underlying technology under DARPA’s Revolutionizing […]

Ethical, scientific issues related to ‘post-market’ clinical trials

July 19, 2010

Amid growing concerns about clinical trials for drugs that have been approved by the FDA but are later linked to serious health risks, an independent committee at the Institute of Medicine led by two professors from The Johns Hopkins University has developed a conceptual framework to guide the agency through the tough decision of ordering […]

Hartwell grant supports innovative early-vision scanner

July 19, 2010

Of all the disorders of vision, amblyopia—sometimes referred to as “lazy eye”—may be one of the most frustrating for clinicians and public health officials. It is both relatively common, affecting as many as 380,000 children in the United States alone, and relatively easy to address if treatment is initiated before age 3. But few children […]

Pinpoint precision: Delivering a biochemical payload to one cell

July 19, 2010

Imagine being able to drop a toothpick on the head of one particular person standing among 100,000 people in a stadium. It sounds impossible, yet this degree of precision at the cellular level has been demonstrated by researchers affiliated with the Johns Hopkins University Institute for NanoBioTechnology. Their study was published online in June in […]

Messenger’s third flyby reveals new information about Mercury

July 19, 2010

Analysis of data from Messenger’s third and final flyby of Mercury in September 2009 has revealed the first observations of emission from an ionized species in Mercury’s exosphere, new information about magnetic substorms and evidence of younger volcanism on the innermost planet than previously recognized. The results are reported in three papers published online July […]

Blind mice can ‘see’ thanks to special retinal cells, study finds

July 19, 2010

It would make the perfect question for the popular television show Are You Smarter than a 5th Grader? What parts of the eye allow us to see? The conventional wisdom: rods and cones. The human retina contains about 120 million rods, which detect light and darkness, shape and movement, and about 7 million cones, which, […]

Link suggested between scleroderma and cancer in certain patients

July 19, 2010

Patients with a certain type of scleroderma may get cancer and scleroderma simultaneously, Johns Hopkins researchers have found, suggesting that in some diseases, autoimmunity and cancer may be linked. These findings could lead researchers closer to discovering what causes scleroderma, an incurable autoimmune disease that causes scar tissue to develop in the skin and in […]

JH Medicine team discovers sweet way to detect prediabetes

July 19, 2010

Having discovered a dramatic increase of an easy-to-detect enzyme in the red blood cells of people with diabetes and prediabetes, Johns Hopkins scientists say the discovery could lead to a simple routine test for detecting the subtle onset of the disease, before symptoms or complications occur and in time to reverse its course. Pilot studies, […]

Recession takes toll on nonprofit workers and programs

July 19, 2010

Nearly 40 percent of nonprofit organizations currently lack adequate staff to deliver their programs and services, according to results of a national survey released July 14 by the Johns Hopkins University Center for Civil Society Studies. Almost a third of organizations reported net reductions in their work forces over the six months preceding the survey […]

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