Day: December 14, 2009

A town hall on No Child Left Behind

December 14, 2009

The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, one of the seminal measures of the Bush administration, ballyhooed a lofty goal of having 100 percent of U.S. students achieving at grade level by the year 2014.

James McGill, head of finance and administration, to retire

December 14, 2009

James T. McGill, senior vice president for finance and administration, will retire June 30 after more than 12 years of managing the financial, physical and human infrastructure of The Johns Hopkins University.

Global environmental change, sustainability major created

December 14, 2009

In an effort to provide tomorrow’s leaders with the tools needed to address both the science and policy issues confronting a world facing global climate change, Johns Hopkins’ Krieger School of Arts and Sciences has created an interdisciplinary major and minor in global environmental change and sustainability.

Central Europe is focus of new initiative created at SAIS

December 14, 2009

Johns Hopkins’ Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies and the Austrian Marshall Plan Foundation of Vienna, Austria, last week announced a new initiative to support research and related activities focused on Central Europe. Daniel Hamilton, SAIS professor and founding director of the SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations, will be appointed the first Austrian Marshall Plan Foundation Professor to head the initiative.

Mousetraps and rubber bands

December 14, 2009

Some were short and stocky, others broad and brawny. Some were stripped down to their essentials, others gussied up with glittery decoration. But all the student-built balsa wood and foam-core cars had one thing in common: The directive to be powered by no more than two mousetraps and six rubber bands. Their goal: to deliver a small, free-standing “flag” (actually a one-and-a-half-inch plastic ball, weighted internally with silicone so that its three-inch plastic flagpole always pointed upward) to a specific point on a three-dimensional course. The cars’ drivers were teams of students in a Whiting School of Engineering course called Freshman Experiences in Mechanical Engineering.

Former RAND Corp. chair to give Leaders & Legends talk

December 14, 2009

Former chair of the RAND Corp. board of trustees and past U.S. Secretary of Labor Ann McLaughlin Korologos will speak on the topic of business practices and ethics at this month’s installment of the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School’s Leaders & Legends lecture series. The event will be held from 7:30 to 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 15, at the Legg Mason Tower in Harbor East.

Bloomberg School establishes International Vaccine Access Center

December 14, 2009

The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has established the International Vaccine Access Center to increase availability of lifesaving vaccines by overcoming many of the obstacles that often delay their usage and distribution. IVAC will also serve as a source of vaccine policy information and analysis and will develop and use evidence to advocate for improved global health policies and their implementation. Projects undertaken by IVAC are supported by grants from the GAVI Alliance and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Three, two, one … lights on!

December 14, 2009

Hundreds of students and several senior administrators crowded near the steps of the Homewood campus’s Eisenhower Library on Monday evening to flip the switch on the holiday season with the annual Lighting of the Quads ceremony.

H1N1 vaccinations now available to all JHU employees

December 14, 2009

Any full-time university faculty or staff member and any part-time university employee for whom Johns Hopkins is the primary employer is now eligible to be vaccinated against H1N1 flu, regardless of age or chronic medical conditions. The vaccine is free to all those showing an employee ID. Vaccinations are available at the Homewood campus office […]

Graveside remembrance of Mr. Hopkins to be held Dec. 24

December 14, 2009

All members of the Johns Hopkins community are invited to the annual graveside observance honoring the institutions’ founder. The brief, informal ceremony will take place at Johns Hopkins’ grave in Green Mount Cemetery at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Dec. 24, the 136th anniversary of his death. Mr. Hopkins left $7 million in his will, at […]

‘Mini’-transplant may reverse severe sickle cell

December 14, 2009

Results of a preliminary study by scientists at the National Institutes of Health and Johns Hopkins show that “mini” stem cell transplantation may safely reverse severe sickle cell disease in adults.

Scientists find potential new ‘twist’ in breast cancer detection

December 14, 2009

Working with mice, scientists at Johns Hopkins have shown that a protein made by a gene called “Twist” may be the proverbial red flag that can accurately distinguish stem cells that drive aggressive, metastatic breast cancer from other breast cancer cells.

On new lab chip, heart cells display a behavior-guiding ‘nanosense’

December 14, 2009

Johns Hopkins biomedical engineers, working with colleagues in Korea, have produced a laboratory chip with nanoscopic grooves and ridges capable of growing cardiac tissue that more closely resembles natural heart muscle. Surprisingly, heart cells cultured in this way used a “nanosense” to collect instructions for growth and function solely from the physical patterns on the nanotextured chip and did not require any special chemical cues to steer the tissue development in distinct ways. The scientists say this tool could be used to design new therapies or diagnostic tests for cardiac disease.

Niacin offers no additional benefits to statin therapy in seniors

December 14, 2009

The routine prescription of extended-release niacin (1,500 milligrams daily), a B vitamin, in combination with traditional cholesterol-lowering therapy offers no extra benefit in correcting arterial narrowing and diminishing plaque buildup in seniors who already have coronary artery disease, a new vascular imaging study from Johns Hopkins experts shows.

Gene therapy, stem cells save limb damaged by low blood flow

December 14, 2009

Blood vessel blockage, a common condition in old age or diabetes, leads to low blood flow and results in low oxygen, which can kill cells and tissues. Such blockages can require amputation of limbs. Now, using mice as their model, researchers at Johns Hopkins have developed therapies that increase blood flow, improve movement and decrease tissue death and the need for amputation. The findings, published online this month in the early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, hold promise for developing clinical therapies.

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