Day: March 21, 2011

Messenger begins historic orbit around Mercury

March 21, 2011

At 9:10 p.m. on Thursday, March 17, engineers in the Messenger Mission Operations Center at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory received the anticipated radiometric signals confirming nominal burn shutdown and successful insertion of the Messenger probe into orbit around the planet Mercury. The spacecraft rotated back to Earth by 9:45 p.m. and started […]

CTY: Math, minds and a milestone

March 21, 2011

President Barack Obama, in his January State of the Union address, challenged Americans, saying, “We need to teach our kids that it’s not just the winner of the Super Bowl who deserves to be celebrated, but the winner of the science fair.” Two Johns Hopkins events—a major math education symposium and a ceremony honoring the […]

Residencies at the end of the rainbow

March 21, 2011

The fourth-year medical students may not have needed the luck of the Irish on March 17, but many wore green and crossed their fingers as they opened envelopes that contained the answer to where they will begin their careers as doctors. From the many smiles, shrieks and tears of joy that followed, the majority got […]

SAIS names new American co- director of Hopkins-Nanjing Center

March 21, 2011

The Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies has named Jason Patent the new American co-director of the Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies, effective May 1. Established in 1986, the center, located in Nanjing, China, is a postgraduate educational joint venture between Johns Hopkins and Nanjing universities, providing approximately […]

Department of Energy calls on expertise of materials scientists

March 21, 2011

In a search for experts to help address the nation’s energy challenges—how to generate and use power more efficiently—materials scientists might not immediately come to mind. But two Whiting School faculty members who study materials recently played key roles in developing a report for the U.S. Department of Energy that identified materials-related products and processing […]

JHU, Uganda’s MU complete learning initiative

March 21, 2011

The Johns Hopkins University and Makerere University in Uganda recently completed a two-year collaborative learning initiative aimed at building educational, research and service capacity at the African university to improve health outcomes in the region. Analysis and review of the two-year project’s impact are documented in a special issue of BMC International Health and Human […]

Russell Taylor named inaugural John C. Malone Professor

March 21, 2011

The John C. Malone Professorship has been created in recognition of the recent $30 million gift to the Whiting School of Engineering from alumnus John C. Malone that will support the construction of Malone Hall, a facility dedicated to research in the areas of individualized health, systems engineering, and computing and information sciences. In keeping […]

Gates visits Jhpiego program in Kenya, hears about family planning

March 21, 2011

During a visit to Jhpiego-supported programs in a slum outside Nairobi, Kenya, Melinda Gates kept hearing the same message: Women want to plan their families so they can provide for their children and give them opportunities they never had. “I talked to more than 50 women about family planning when I was in Kenya, and […]

For smokers, Internet both promotes, undermines cessation

March 21, 2011

A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows both the intended and unintended consequences of cigarette taxes. According to an analysis of Internet search data, the 2009 U.S. federal cigarette excise tax increase successfully drove many smokers online to find ways to quit smoking, but more often smokers […]

Newer not better when it comes to type 2 diabetes drugs

March 21, 2011

An inexpensive type 2 diabetes drug that has been around for more than 15 years works just as well and has fewer side effects than a half-dozen other, mostly newer and more expensive, classes of medication used to control the chronic disease, new Johns Hopkins research suggests. In its report, published online March 14 in […]

Gene variant influences chronic kidney disease risk

March 21, 2011

A team of researchers from the United States and Europe has identified a single genetic mutation in the CUBN gene that is associated with albuminuria both with and without diabetes. Albuminuria is a condition caused by the leaking of the protein albumin into the urine, which is an indication of kidney disease. The research team, known […]

Guided Care reduces health service use by ill older adults

March 21, 2011

A new report shows that older people who receive Guided Care use fewer expensive health services compared to older people who receive regular primary care. Research published in the March edition of Archives of Internal Medicine found that after 20 months of a randomized controlled trial, Guided Care patients experienced, on average, 30 percent fewer home […]

Researchers at Johns Hopkins discover insulin-releasing switch

March 21, 2011

Johns Hopkins researchers believe that they have uncovered the molecular switch for the secretion of insulin—the hormone that regulates blood sugar—providing for the first time an explanation of this process. In a report published online March 1 in Cell Metabolism, the researchers say that the work solves a longtime mystery and may lead to better […]

JHU team creates stem cells from schizophrenia patients

March 21, 2011

Using skin cells from adult siblings with schizophrenia and a genetic mutation linked to major mental illnesses, Johns Hopkins researchers have created induced pluripotent stem cells using a new and improved “clean” technique. Reporting online Feb. 22 in Molecular Psychiatry, the team confirms the establishment of two new lines of iPS cells with mutations in […]

New study suggests ALS could be caused by a retrovirus

March 21, 2011

A retrovirus that inserted itself into the human genome thousands of years ago may be responsible for some cases of the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The finding, made by Johns Hopkins scientists, may eventually give researchers a new way to attack this universally fatal condition. While roughly 20 percent […]

Next Page »